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JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY
Vol. 44, No. 10, 2006; Pages: 3838–3841


Shiga Toxin 2-Producing Acinetobacter haemolyticus Associated with a Case of Bloody Diarrhea

German Grotiuz,† Alfredo Sirok,† Pilar Gadea, Gustavo Varela, and Felipe Schelotto*

Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli Reference Laboratory, Department of Bacteriology and Virology,
Institute of Hygiene, Av. Dr. Alfredo Navarro 3051, CP 11600, Montevideo, Uruguay.

Abstract

We report the first Shiga toxin 2-producing Acinetobacter haemolyticus strain that was isolated from the feces of a 3-month-old infant with bloody diarrhea. Usual enteropathogenic bacteria were not detected. This finding suggests that any Shiga toxin-producing microorganism capable of colonizing the human gut may have the potential to cause illnessIn November 2001, a 3-month-old male infant was admitted at Pereira Rossell Pediatric Hospital with bloody diarrhea of 12 h evolution without fever or other previous pathologies. The patient was treated empirically with intravenous ceftriaxone and hospitalized for 24 h. Samples of feces were obtained before and after the patient was treated with antibiotics, and they were simultaneously studied at the Microbiology laboratory of the Pereira Rossell Pediatric Hospital and at the Reference laboratory for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli. This last study, done in the context of an institutional program aimed at the regional surveillance of bloody diarrheas and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) etiology, is the focus of the present article.

Keywords:Shigatoxin2-roducing;Acinetobacterhaemolyticus;enteropathogenic;enteropathogenic bacteria;Escherichia coli;Salmonella;Shigella;Bloody Diarrhea;taxonomy.


Corresponding author: Tel 598 2 4875795; Fax 598 2 4873073

E-mail: bacvir@higiene.edu.uy

 

 
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