Subscribe here to get periodical Newsletter issues on Microorganisms and Environment Management at free of cost.
Press release

November 2019

Altering intestinal microbiota, vaccinating against inflammatory diseases

     Targeted immunization against bacterial flagellin, a protein that forms the appendage that enables bacterial mobility, can beneficially alter the intestinal microbiota, decreasing the bacteria's ability to cause inflammation and thus protecting against an array of chronic inflammatory diseases, according to a new study.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

Bacteria in the gut may alter aging process

     An international research team led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has found that microorganisms living in the gut may alter the ageing process, which could lead to the development of food-based treatment to slow it down.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

Bacteria may contribute more to climate change as planet heats up

     By releasing more carbon as global temperatures rise, bacteria and related organisms called archaea could increase climate warming at a faster rate than current models suggest. The new research, published today in Nature Communications by scientists from Imperial College London, could help inform more accurate models of future climate warming.

Source: sciencedaily

 

— Read more

Engineers invent smartphone device that detects harmful algae in 15 minutes

     A team of engineers has developed a highly sensitive system that uses a smartphone to rapidly detect the presence of toxin-producing algae in water within 15 minutes. This technological breakthrough could play a big role in preventing the spread of harmful microorganisms in aquatic environments, which could threaten global public health and cause environmental problems.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

October 2019

Human gut microbes could make processed foods healthier

     A new study sheds light on how human gut microbes break down processed foods -- especially potentially harmful chemical changes often produced during modern food manufacturing processes.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

Lifestyle is a threat to gut bacteria: Ötzi proves it, study shows

     The evolution of dietary and hygienic habits in Western countries is associated with a decrease in the bacteria that help in digestion. These very bacteria were also found in the Iceman, who lived 5300 years ago, and are still present in non-Westernized populations in various parts of the world. The depletion of the microbiome may be associated with the increased prevalence, in Western countries, of complex conditions like allergies, autoimmune and gastrointestinal diseases, obesity.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

Transient and long-term disruption of gut microbes after antibiotics

     Antibiotic treatment is known to disrupt the community structure of intestinal microbes -- the 500 to 1,000 bacterial species that have a mainly beneficial influence in humans. A study now has tracked this disruption at the level of a strain of microbes replacing another strain of the same species in 30 individuals -- all of them young, healthy adults who would be expected to have stable microbial communities.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

Soil microbes play a key role in plant disease resistance

     Scientists have discovered that soil microbes can make plants more resistant to an aggressive disease opening new possibilities for sustainable food production. Bacterial wilt disease caused by Ralstonia solanacearum infects several plants including tomatoes and potatoes. It causes huge economic losses around the world especially in China, Indonesia and Africa.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

September 2019

Soil microbes play a key role in plant disease resistance

     Scientists have discovered that soil microbes can make plants more resistant to an aggressive disease opening new possibilities for sustainable food production. Bacterial wilt disease caused by Ralstonia solanacearum infects several plants including tomatoes and potatoes. It causes huge economic losses around the world especially in China, Indonesia and Africa.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

Study of bile acids links individual's genetics and microbial gut community

     New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (16-20 Sept) suggests that a 16-week vegan diet can boost the gut microbes that are related to improvements in body weight, body composition and blood sugar control. The study is by Dr Hana Kahleova, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), Washington, DC, USA, and colleagues.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

Short-term study suggests vegan diet can boost gut microbes related to body weight, body composition and blood sugar control

     Mythbuster: The idea that bacterial collaborations within microbiomes, like in the mouth, have evolved to be generous and exclusive very much appears to be wrong. In an extensive experiment, lavish collaborations ensued between random microbes. And some bacteria from the same microbiome were stingy with one another.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

A comprehensive catalog of human digestive tract bacteria

     The human digestive tract is home to thousands of different strains of bacteria. Many of these are beneficial, while others contribute to health problems such as inflammatory bowel disease. Researchers have now isolated and preserved samples of nearly 8,000 of these strains, while also clarifying their genetic and metabolic context.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

August 2019

Study of bile acids links individual's genetics and microbial gut community

     In a new study published 29th August in PLOS Genetics, Federico Rey of the University of Wisconsin Madison and colleagues identified genetic variants in mice that impact the levels of different bile acids as well as the size of a specific population of microbes in the gut.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

New insight into bacterial infections found in the noses of healthy cattle

     New research used the 'One Health' approach to study three bacterial species in the noses of young cattle and found the carriage of the bacteria was surprisingly different. The findings which combined ideas and methods from both animal and human health research could help prevent and control respiratory diseases.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

Genetic census of the human microbiome

     Scientists have analyzed the genetic repertoire of bacteria in the human mouth and gut. The effort marks the first chapter in efforts to compile a compendium of all genes in the human microbiome. Mapping the microbial genome can reveal links between bacterial genes and disease risk and could inform the development of precision therapies.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

Rye is healthy, thanks to an interplay of microbes

     Eating rye comes with a variety of health benefits. A new study now shows that both lactic acid bacteria and gut bacteria contribute to the health benefits of rye. The study used a metabolomics approach to analyze metabolites found in food and the human body.

Source: sciencedaily

 

— Read more

July 2019

Solar energy becomes biofuel without solar cells

     Soon we will be able to replace fossil fuels with a carbon-neutral product created from solar energy, carbon dioxide and water. Researchers have successfully produced microorganisms that can efficiently produce the alcohol butanol using carbon dioxide and solar energy, without needing to use solar cells.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

Bacteria enhance coral resilience to climate change effects

     Researchers investigated the interplay between corals and bacteria under changing environmental conditions. Their research results were published in the current issue of the journal Nature Communications.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

These gut bacteria prevent mice from becoming obese -- what could that mean for us?

     A specific class of bacteria from the gut prevents mice from becoming obese, suggesting these same microbes may similarly control weight in people, a new study reports. The beneficial bacteria, called Clostridia, are part of the microbiome -- collectively trillions of bacteria and other microorganisms that inhabit the intestine.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

Can mathematics help us understand the complexity of our microbiome?

     In humans, the gut microbiome is an ecosystem of hundreds to thousands of microbial species living within the gastrointestinal tract, influencing health and even longevity. As interest in studying the microbiome continues to increase, understanding this complexity will give us predictive power to engineer it. A research team built a rigorous mathematical framework that describes the ecology of a microbiome coupled to its host.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

June 2019

New therapy targets gut bacteria to prevent and reverse food allergies

     A new study identifies the species of bacteria in the human infant gut that protect against food allergies, finding changes associated with the development of food allergies and an altered immune response.

Source: sciencedaily

 

— Read more

Synthetic biology roadmap could set research agenda for next 10 years

     Synthetic biology is an umbrella term for the growing field of changing the fundamental design of living organisms to engineer solutions to complex problems editing their genetic components to change their function.

Source: Phys

 

— Read more

Leaving microbes out of climate change conversation has major consequences, experts warn

     Leading microbiologists have issued a warning, saying that not including microbes the support system of the biosphere in the climate change equation will have major negative flow-on effects.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

New microorganism for algae biomass to produce alternative fuels

     Scientists utilized algae that grow three times faster than starch crops and succeeded in producing biofuel and biochemicals. They developed a new artificial microorganism as a microbial platform for the biorefinery of brown macroalgae which is possible to accelerate biochemical production rate.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

May- 2019

Natural environments favor 'good' bacteria

     A new study has shown that restoring environments to include a wider range of species can promote 'good' bacteria over 'bad' with potential benefits for human health.

Source: sciencedaily

 

— Read more

Distinct microbes found living next to corals

     Symbiotic algae living inside corals provide those animals with their vibrant color, as well as many of the nutrients they need to survive. That algae, and other microbes within the bodies of corals, have been extensively studied yet until now, researchers have largely ignored the microbial communities just outside of the coral colonies. A new study describes microbes that live just a few centimeters from the surface of corals, laying the groundwork for future studies.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

Anxiety might be alleviated by regulating gut bacteria

     People who experience anxiety symptoms might be helped by taking steps to regulate the microorganisms in their gut using probiotic and non-probiotic food and supplements, suggests a review of studies published today in the journal General Psychiatry.

Source: sciencedaily

 

— Read more

Plastic pollution harms the bacteria that help produce the oxygen we breathe

     Ten percent of the oxygen we breathe comes from just one kind of bacteria in the ocean. Now laboratory tests have shown that these bacteria are susceptible to plastic pollution, according to a new study.

Source: sciencedaily

 

— Read more

April- 2019

Researchers reveal how bacteria can adapt to resist treatment by antibiotics

     New research shows that bacteria produce a specific stress molecule, divide more slowly, and thus save energy when they are exposed to antibiotics. The new knowledge is expected to form the basis for development of a new type of antibiotics.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

How Enterococcus faecalis bacteria causes antibiotic resistant infection

     A new study describes how bacteria adapted to the modern hospital environment and repeatedly cause antibiotic-resistant bloodstream infections. This study examined one of the first sustained hospital outbreaks of a multidrug-resistant bacterium, Enterococcus faecalis, which occurred from the early through the mid-1980s, causing over 60 outbreak strains.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

All microbes and fungi on the International Space Station catalogued

     A comprehensive catalogue of the bacteria and fungi found on surfaces inside the International Space Station (ISS) is being presented in a study published in the open access journal Microbiome. Knowledge of the composition of the microbial and fungal communities on the ISS can be used to develop safety measures for NASA for long-term space travel or living in space.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

Deep microbes' key contribution to Earth's carbon cycle

     Hydrocarbons play key roles in atmospheric and biogeochemistry, the energy economy, and climate change. Most hydrocarbons form in anaerobic environments through high temperature or microbial decomposition of organic matter. Subsurface microorganisms can also 'eat' hydrocarbons, preventing them from reaching the atmosphere. Using a new technique, scientists show that biological hydrocarbon degradation gives a unique biological signature. These findings could help detect subsurface biology and understand the carbon cycle and its impact on climate.
 

— Read more

March- 2019

Same microbe, different effect

     Our gut microbiome the complement of bacteria we carry around in our intestines has been linked to everything from obesity and diabetes to heart disease and even neurological disorders and cancer. In recent years, researchers have been sorting through the multiple bacterial species that populate the microbiome, asking which of them can be implicated in specific disorders. But a paper published today in Nature addressed a new question: "What if the same microbe is different in different people?"

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

Excessive phosphate fertilizer use can reduce microbial functions critical to crop health

     Scientists set out to determine if nutrient history changed the function of soil microorganisms. The answer seems to be yes, and that soil treated with high amounts of phosphate can result in poorer plant performance, but even more intriguing, it appears that the soil microorganisms from this conditioned soil can negatively impact plant yield.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

Most microbes in hummingbird feeders do not pose health hazard

     A new study is one of the first to address the potential for sugar water from hummingbird feeders to act as a vector for avian or even zoonotic pathogens. It found that the majority of microbes growing in feeders do not likely pose a significant health hazard to birds or humans.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

Plant seed research provides basis for sustainable alternatives to chemical fertilizers

     Scientists assessed the seed microbiomes of two successive plant generations for the first time and discovered that seeds are an important vector for transmission of beneficial endophytes across generations.

Source: sciencedaily

 
 

— Read more

February- 2019

Dermal disruption: Amphibian skin bacteria is more diverse in cold, variable environments

     Researchers swabbed more than 2300 animals representing 205 amphibian species to better understand the ecology of their skin bacteria. They asked which environmental factors influence the makeup of their microbiomes and how might the makeup of their microbiomes be important to amphibian health and survival?.

Source: sciencedaily

 

 

— Read more

Effect of breastfeeding versus pumping on human milk microbiome

     A large-scale analysis in humans suggests that the milk microbiota is affected by bacteria both from the infant's mouth and from environmental sources such as breast pumps, although future research will be needed to assess the effects that these changes may have on the infant gut microbiome and infant health.

Source: sciencedaily

 

 

— Read more

New disease surveillance tool helps detect any human-infecting virus

     A new computational method called 'CATCH' designs molecular 'baits' for any virus known to infect humans and all their known strains, including those that are present in low abundance in clinical samples, such as Zika. The approach can help small sequencing centers around the globe conduct disease surveillance, which is crucial for controlling outbreaks.

Source: sciencedaily

 

 

— Read more

The web meets genomics: A DNA search engine for microbes

     Microbes are the most common and diverse organisms on the planet. A new search engine, called BIGSI, allows scientists to search public microbial DNA data for specific genes and mutations. This could help researchers monitor the spread of antibiotic resistance genes, and understand how bacteria and viruses evolve and adapt.

Source: sciencedaily

 

 
 

— Read more

January- 2019

European waters drive ocean overturning, key for regulating climate

     An international study reveals the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, which helps regulate Earth's climate, is highly variable and primarily driven by the conversion of warm, salty, shallow waters into colder, fresher, deep waters moving south through the Irminger and Iceland basins. This upends prevailing ideas and may help scientists better predict Arctic ice melt and future changes in the ocean's ability to mitigate climate change by storing excess atmospheric carbon.

Source: sciencedaily

 

 

— Read more

Huge step forward in decoding genomes of small species

     For the first time, scientists have read the whole genetic code of one single mosquito. Scientists worked to advance technology and lower the starting amount of DNA needed to just 'half a mosquito-worth', producing the first high quality whole genome of a single mosquito. The study in genes opens the door to understanding the true genetic diversity of insects and other arthropods.

Source: sciencedaily

 

 

— Read more

Shellfish could revolutionize human health research

      Shellfish like oysters and mussels have the potential to revolutionize human health research, according to a new article. The study reveals how using bivalves as model organisms offers numerous promising avenues for medical research from pharmaceutical development to bone regeneration.

Source: sciencedaily

 

 

— Read more

Scientists explore tick salivary glands as tool to study virus transmission, infection

     The salivary glands of some tick species could become important research tools for studying how viruses are transmitted from ticks to mammals, and for developing preventive medical countermeasures. Tick salivary glands usually block transmission, but a new study focuses on the role of salivary glands in spreading flaviviruses from black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) to mammals.

Source: sciencedaily

 

 

— Read more

 
 
 
Copyright © 2005 ENVIS Centre ! All rights reserved This site is optimized for 1024 x 768 screen resolution Query Form | Feedback | Privacy