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Image of the Week

JUNE 2017

Week 25 (18 - 24)

Fruit bodies of Cladonia pyxidata (Lichenised fungus)

Image Credit: Ali Ashby

Week 24 (11 - 17)

An immunofluorescence microscopy image depicts the intestinal lumen of a mouse lacking claudin-2, a diarrhea-inducing tight junction protein. In these deficient mice, C. rodentium bacteria (red) infiltrate the intestines. DNA stained in blue; F-actin (denoting cells' external-facing surfaces) in green.

Image Credit: TURNER LABORATORY AT BRIGHAM AND WOMEN’S HOSPITAL

Week 23 (04 - 10)

More than a decade ago, MIT researchers, led by biological engineer Christopher Voigt, engineered bacterial cultures to produce black-and-white photo negatives mirroring patterns of light projected onto the dish. Augmenting the cells to sense light and produce black pigment in response required only four genes. Now wielding a suite of 18 genes, Voigt’s team has created a microbial color palate that can paint a fruit still life, a geometric lizard motif, and a leaping Super Mario.

 

Week 22 (28 - 03)

The artist, Ana Tsitsishvili from Tbilisi, Georgia, won third place with this arrangement of bacteria and fungi on brain-heart infusion agar. The common skin microbe, Staphylococcus epidermidis, is responsible for the white color; Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, common in milk, soil, and air, makes pink; Micrococcus luteus, frequently found in soil, water, air, and skin, is responsible for the lady's luscious yellow locks; Xanthomonas axonopodis, a pathogenic plant microbe, makes green. Combinations of these various microbes make up everything in between.

Image Credit: AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR MICROBIOLOGY'S 3RD ANNUAL AGAR ART CONTEST

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