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Beneficial Microbes
Vol. 6; No. 1; 2015; Pages: 129 – 140

Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus by crude and fractionated extract from lactic acid bacteria

C.B. Wong, B.Y. Khoo, S. Sasidharan, W. Piyawattanametha, S.H. Kim, N. Khemthongcharoen, M.Y. Ang, L.O. Chuah, M.T. Liong

School of Industrial Technology, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Penang, Malaysia.


Increasing levels of antibiotic resistance by Staphyloccocus aureus have posed a need to search for non-antibiotic alternatives. This study aimed to assess the inhibitory effects of crude and fractionated cell-free supernatants (CFS) of locally isolated lactic acid bacteria (LAB) against a clinical strain of S. aureus. A total of 42 LAB strains were isolated and identified from fresh vegetables, fresh fruits and fermented products prior to evaluation of inhibitory activities. CFS of LAB strains exhibiting a stronger inhibitive effect against S. aureus were fractionated into crude protein, polysaccharide and lipid fractions. Crude protein fractions showed greater inhibition against S. aureus compared to polysaccharide and lipid fractions, with a more prevalent effect from Lactobacillus plantarum 8513 and L. plantarum BT8513. Crude protein, polysaccharide and lipid fractions were also characterised with glycine, mannose and oleic acid being detected as the major component of each fraction, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy revealed roughed and wrinkled membrane morphology of S. aureus upon treatment with crude protein fractions of LAB, suggesting an inhibitory effect via the destruction of cellular membrane. This research illustrated the potential application of fractionated extracts from LAB to inhibit S. aureus for use in the food and health industry.

Keywords:lactobacilli, antimicrobials, anti-staphylococcal .



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